• Image of Caroline Davies

    CSD Heroes: Alexandra Martha Zoya Slawin

    In the year that the CSD hit one million structures we are highlighting some of the most prolific contributors to the database. Our 5th CSD Hero in this series is Alexandra Martha Zoya Slawin who is currently 6th in our annual CSD author statistics. We wanted to thank Slawin for her contribution by doing what we do best – searching the CSD! 

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  • Image of Lucy White

    From the community...

    The CSD - a valuable tool in modern organic synthesis and drug discovery

    We always love hearing feedback from users of our tools and services, especially when they share with us how they've used the CSD to advance their research.  So it was great to hear from Prof. Alexander Dömling and Assis. Prof. Constantinos Neochoritis from the University of Crete, who used the CSD and CCDC tools, including ConQuest, Mogul, CSD-CrossMiner and IsoStar, in their recent research. Read their story below... 

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  • Image of Francesca Stanzione

    A Million Crystal Structures: the CSD Contribution in the Designing of Biologically-Active Molecules

    Recently our colleague Pete Wood, in collaboration with Robin Taylor, authored an exhaustive review on how the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) has proved to be an invaluable resource for the design and development of new drugs, as well as for the design of commercially relevant materials such as dyes and energetic materials. You can read the full review ‘A Million Crystal Structures: The Whole is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts’ here.

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  • Image of Caroline Davies

    CSD Heroes: Frank Fronczek

    Our fourth CSD Hero is Frank Fronczek, currently 7th in our annual CSD author statistics

    Frank Fronczek is Director of the X-ray Facility at Louisiana State University and a Fellow of the American Crystallographic Association.  He was a postdoc at the University of California at Berkeley after receiving his PhD at Caltech, with Dick Marsh (trained by Linus Pauling) and Bill Schaefer.(1) 

    We would like to thank Frank by highlighting some of his key contributions to the CSD.

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  • Image of Caroline Davies

    CSD Heroes: Judith Howard

    Our 3rd CSD Hero is Judith Howard who is currently 8th in our annual CSD author statistics.  To thank Judith for her contributions we are taking a look at some of her CSD highlights. 

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  • Image of Caroline Davies

    CSD Heroes: H.-K.Fun

    Our second CSD Hero is H.‑K.Fun, currently 9th in our annual CSD author statistics! We would like to thank Fun for his contribution by highlighting some key facts drawn from data in the CSD! 

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  • Image of Caroline Davies

    CSD Heroes: A huge thank you to Seik Weng Ng

    In the year that the CSD hit one million structures we wanted to highlight and thank some of the most prolific contributors to the database. The first person in this series we would like to recognise is Seik Weng Ng.  He is currently 10th in our annual CSD author statistics and so we wanted to thank him for his contribution by doing what we do best – exploring the CSD! 

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  • Image of Lucy White

    The past, the present, the future

    We are delighted to announce that today we have launched our new logo as part of our plans to refresh our visual identity.

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  • Image of Seth Wiggin

    Insights into drug-like compounds from crystal data

    As the size of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) has just passed one million structures, it seems an appropriate time to look at some of the applications of this ever-growing resource. Whilst the CSD is certainly useful as a central record of past data collections, perhaps the more significant benefits are the insights that can be gained from looking at this mass of data as a whole. In this blog, I’ll show some examples of what can be discovered from statistics generated from the CSD when looking at drug-like compounds. A paper written by CCDC colleagues with researchers from Pfizer and AstraZeneca (Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Volume 108, Issue 5, 2019, Pages 1655-1662, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xphs.2018.12.011) gives an in-depth statistical analysis of drug compounds in the CSD.

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  • Image of Suzanna Ward

    A million thanks

    Today marks a huge milestone in structural chemistry – the sharing of one million organic and metal-organic crystal structures, an achievement of which the entire community should be extremely proud! The creation of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) to share and distribute these structures is truly a team effort. Crystallographers worldwide deposit their data with us and our team of Deposition Coordinators and Scientific Editors here in Cambridge curate and enhance their structures into the database.

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